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Cervical cap

Cervical cap

What is a cervical cap?

A cervical cap is a flexible, hollow latex or plastic rubber cup that snugly covers the cervix. It is inserted deep inside the vagina to keep sperm out of your uterus. Cervical caps come in different sizes determined by your pregnancy history.
– The small is recommended for women who have never been pregnant.
– The medium is recommended for women who have had an abortion, miscarriage, or delivered by cesarean section.
– The large is recommended for women who have had a vaginal delivery.
To ensure that you have the right size, you may need to have a fitting with a specifically trained health-care provider. Other resources, like video instructions, can also help you learn how to insert the cap.
For the cervical cap to be effective, you need to insert it every time you have sex.

How does a cervical cap work?

A cervical cap acts as a physical barrier between the sperm and cervix (where it is held by suction). The cap works best when it is used together with a spermicide so that any sperm that attempts to get to the cervix is killed or immobilized before it slips through.

How effective is the cervical cap?

The cervical cap becomes effective at preventing pregnancy immediately after it is inserted. However, it is not one of the most effective contraception methods. It is most effective when used in combination with a spermicide. Its effectiveness also depends on whether you have given birth or not. The effectiveness of the cervical cap is higher in women who have not given birth.

If you have ever given birth, the cervical cap is one of the least effective contraceptives. As commonly used by this category of women, it is 68% effective. This means that 32 out of 100 women using this method end up getting pregnant within the first year of use. With perfect use, it is 74% effective at preventing pregnancy, meaning that 26 out of 100 women using this method correctly end up getting pregnant within the first year of use.

If you have never given birth, the cap is 84% effective with typical usage, meaning that 16 out of 100 women using this method are likely to get pregnant within the first year of using it. With correct use, it is 91% effective. This means that only 9 out of 100 women using this method are likely to end up pregnant within the first year of use.

Fertility will return immediately after you remove the cap (2).

Who can use a cervical cap?

– It is a good option for women who cannot use hormonal contraception due to medical reasons or preferences.
– Couples who do not mind the risk of pregnancy.
– Women who do not have sex regularly and just require intermittent protection.
– Women who require a backup method of contraceptive because they have either missed a pill, are waiting for another contraceptive method to take effect, or are on a drug that may be interfering with their regular contraceptive.
– Women who are more than six weeks postpartum. The cervical cap is likely to be less effective soon after giving birth. Six weeks after giving birth, the cervix will have returned to a normal size, and it will be safe to use the cap. It does not affect lactation or the development of an infant. You will need to get refitted for another cap after giving birth.
– Breastfeeding mothers with a latex allergy or sensitivity.

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