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Am I pregnant?

If you recently had unprotected sex and want to confirm whether you are pregnant or not, there are certain signs and symptoms you can look out for.

A missed menstrual period is often the first indication of a pregnancy but it is not 100% reliable because periods can be delayed due to many other factors e.g. it could be a side effect of a contraceptive, changes in daily diet, stress or some other medical problem. To learn about the potential side effects of different contraceptive methods, visit Find My Method

Even if you have been using birth control, there’s a chance that your method failed. Contraceptives are not perfect and they all have different degrees of effectiveness. If you want to hear from women who have experienced contraceptive failure, visit our forum.

To learn how pregnancy actually occurs, visit our page “How does a pregnancy happen?” If you have any questions, e-mail us at info@findmymethod.org or send us a message via Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

To start, look for the following symptoms:

Early pregnancy symptoms
Early pregnancy symptoms

 

  • Morning sickness which, despite the name, can happen at any time of the day. If you feel nauseous and can’t keep anything down, visit your doctor.
  • Changes in your breasts that are similar to the differences you experience before your period, along with a tingling sensation, more visible veins, and darker, erect nipples.
  • Frequent urination – you may start waking up in the middle of the night to pee.
  • Constipation
  • Vaginal discharge – increased secretion of a white milky substance without any soreness or irritation. Also, brown or pinkish blood that’s lighter in flow and doesn’t last as long as your period.
  • Tiredness
  • A strange taste – many women describe having a metallic taste in their mouth.
  • Unusual aversions such as disliking tea, coffee, tobacco smoke, or fatty food.
  • Random cravings.

 

Based on these symptoms, do you think you could be pregnant?
Take our quiz below to find out more.

1. Did you have unprotected sex in the last 5 days?



Given this short timeframe, it is possible to prevent pregnancy using an emergency contraception pill. It’s 99% effective and safe; is available in most pharmacies globally and can protect for up to 72 to 120 hours (dependeing on the brand) after unprotected sex. Another option is copper IUD; it can be inserted 120 hours after unprotected sex and can also work as a long-term contraceptive. To get more information about emergency contraception, visit: https://findmymethod.org/findmethod/emergency-contraception/

2. Have you had sex since your last period?



Did you use protection?




3. Do you usually use contraceptives? Choose the most frequent.









4. When is your next period due?






5. Have you experienced “morning sickness” at any time of the day?




6. Have you had cramps?



7. Have you had spotting?



8. Have you noticed any changes in your breasts?




9. How would you describe your level of tiredness?




10. Have you been going to the toilet more frequently?



11. Have you experienced…






12. Did you plan on getting pregnant?



Based on your answers, there is a chance that you are pregnant. We recommend that you take a pregnancy test to confirm this. To learn how you can do that, visit our page “How to confirm a pregnancy?”. And if you are curious how a pregnancy occurs, visit our page “How does a pregnancy happen?” to learn about the process.

Based on your answers, there is a chance that you are pregnant. We recommend that you take a pregnancy test to confirm this. To learn how you can do that, visit our page “How to confirm a pregnancy?”.
If this is an unplanned pregnancy, visit our page “Pregnancy options” to learn about different alternatives available if you don’t want to become a mother.

Based on your answers, there is a low chance that you are pregnant. We recommend that you take a pregnancy test to confirm this. To learn how you can do that, visit our page “How to confirm a pregnancy?”. We understand a delay in period - even for a few days - could make anyone anxious. But pregnancy is not the only time periods are delayed; using a hormonal contraceptive or having taken an emergency contraception pill could also cause this. To learn about potential side effects of different contraceptive methods, visit: findmymethod.org


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