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What are the pros and cons of the contraceptive sponge?

What are the pros and cons of the contraceptive sponge?
What are the pros and cons of the contraceptive sponge?

Benefits of the contraceptive sponge

Health benefits

– It is hormone-free. The sponge has no hormones, so you will be able to get pregnant as soon as you stop using it. Protect yourself with another method if you stop using the sponge and do not want to get pregnant.
– It can be used while breastfeeding.

Lifestyle benefits

– You can put the sponge in up to 24 hours in advance.
– One size fits all so you do not have to have it fitted by a health-care provider.
– During its 24-hour protection, you can have sex as many times as you like.
– It’s a good option if you don’t mind getting pregnant. Most people do not use the sponge correctly, so women often wind up pregnant. If you do not want to get pregnant or have a baby, think about using a different method.
– Neither you nor your partner should be able to feel the sponge.
– No prescription is necessary.

What are the side effects of a contraceptive sponge?

– Women who are allergic to sulfa drugs, polyurethane, or spermicide may have an allergic reaction.
– It can cause vaginal irritation.
– If the sponge is left in for more than 24 hours, it may result in a foul odor or vaginal discharge.

Disadvantages of using a contraceptive sponge

– Some women have a hard time inserting and removing the sponge.
– It’s high effort. It requires self-discipline and planning since you have to remember to insert the sponge every time you have sex.
– It is not one of the most effective methods of contraception, especially for women who have given birth.
– You need to be comfortable with your body. If you are not okay with putting your fingers inside your vagina, the sponge is not the best option for you. It is a lot like putting in a tampon, though, so if you can do that, you can probably manage the sponge.
– It must be left in place for at least six hours after having sex.
– It may make sex messier.
– It’s hard to remember to use if you are drunk.
– It may make sex drier.

Does the contraceptive sponge prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs)?

The sponge does not protect against STIs like gonorrhea and chlamydia (3).

When might you not be eligible for a sponge?

– If you have ever suffered from toxic shock syndrome.
– If it hasn’t been more than six weeks since you gave birth.
– If you have an allergic reaction to sulfites.
– If you are on your menstrual period.
– If you have ever had an allergic reaction to nonoxynol-9 (the chemical used in spermicides).
You should also exercise caution by seeking the advice of your health-care provider before using a sponge if
– you have been medically advised against getting pregnant;
– you recently had a miscarriage or an abortion; or
– you have a uterine or vaginal condition like vaginal septum or uterine prolapse, which may prevent the sponge from working (5).

Contraception Quiz

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When it comes to sex, protection is as important as pleasure. But what should one do to start their safe sex journey? Answer some simple questions and based on the responses, we will recommend the next steps.

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External Condom

Compare with similar Contraceptive Methods

Are you wondering if condoms are better than daily pills? Or if you should opt for a birth control implant? We're here to assist you in making this decision. You can select up to 5 contraceptive methods and compare them side by side to weigh the pros and cons of each.

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