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The Birth Control Shot Side Effects

The Birth Control  Shot Side Effects
The Birth Control Shot Side Effects

The most common side effects of contraception injection are changes that the users observe in their bleeding patterns. Just like with most hormonal contraceptives, different injectables will usually respond differently to different bodies. If you are the kind of person that prefers having regular periods, you may wonder whether the injectable that you choose will favor your preferred patterns of bleeding. The changes to expect will usually depend on the type of injectable that you are using.

Does the Birth Control shot stop periods?

DMPA users:

You may experience irregular or prolonged bleeding within the first three months; and, after a year, infrequent or irregular bleeding or no bleeding at all.

NET-EN users:

You may experience less affected bleeding patterns compared to DMPA with a few days of bleeding within the first six months and monthly bleeding after a year.

Monthly injectables users:

You may experience lighter and fewer days of bleeding; infrequent, irregular, or prolonged bleeding, or no bleeding at all.

If you stop experiencing monthly bleeding after one year of using the injection, do not be alarmed! These bleeding changes are quite common and not necessarily harmful. However, if you have been late with your injections and you suspect that you may be pregnant, perform a pregnancy test as soon as possible. If you find the bleeding changes bothersome, you should consult your healthcare provider for guidance on other less bothersome options.

More Contraceptive Injection Side Effects

Less common side effects of contraceptive injections include:

  1. headaches,
  2. dizziness,
  3. changes in sex drive,
  4. depression,
  5. hair loss or more hair on your face or body,
  6. mood swings,
  7. breast tenderness, and
  8. abdominal bloating and discomfort.

There is no way to stop the side effects of the injectable. If you feel the side effects are more than you can bear, consider switching to a different method.

Why am I bleeding on a Birth control shot?

If you are on DMPA, you are more likely to experience changes in bleeding patterns compared to the other types of injectables. According to Pfizer, 54% of DMPA users might experience irregular bleeding or spotting within the first year, while 32% will experience this for up to two years. The longer you use DMPA, the more likely the spotting will subside.

Does the birth control shot cause weight gain?

Women typically gain one to two kilograms per year, but some women either lose or do not experience any weight loss. Asian women are commonly known to not gain any weight from using DMPA.[9].

Women who gain weight in the first six months of use may be at higher risk for continued weight gain while using the injection. While some women may not be bothered by this, others will not be happy. If you want to keep the weight off, add some exercise to your daily routine or consult with a provider about your eating habits

Can the birth control shot cause infertility?

No. But those who stop using injections to get pregnant might experience a delay before getting pregnant. Women who stop using Depo to get pregnant may have a waiting period of more than a year. Depo has a hormone that is supposed to protect you from pregnancy for up to three months by stopping ovulation. Though this hormone stops being effective after three months, its residue usually lingers in one’s muscle tissues for longer and delays fertility. On average, it takes 4-12 months after stopping Depo shots to start ovulating again. However, some people will go up to 2 years before they become pregnant. It is not advisable to use Depo if you want to get pregnant soon.

How safe is Birth Control Injection?

Like other hormonal contraceptives, Birth Control Injections are a safe and effective way of preventing pregnancy and also come with a few possible risks, including:

  • Loss of bone density. Using Depo-Provera affects your natural estrogen levels, which can, in turn, cause thinning of the bones. This, however, reverses when one stops using this contraception.
  • There are needles involved. If you are scared of needles, the injectable is not for you.
  • There’s a small risk of infection at the site of the injection. In rare cases, some people may have an allergic reaction to the injection.
  • It doesn’t protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Can you detox your body from the Birth Control shot?

The hormones contained in the injections are not toxic. And there is no known scientific reason or a way to detox from contraceptive hormones. Once the effectiveness period lapses the active hormones will usually start wearing off your body. While this may take longer for DMPA, it is a completely safe and normal process that does not require any kind of intervention. But if you are looking for a smoother transition, it is advisable to eat a balanced diet, exercise, avoid cigarettes and alcohol, and have enough sleep.

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Compare with similar Contraceptive Methods

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